We all live in Dystopia by Frances Kay


















Guest article by Frances Kay

‘If the book we are reading does not wake us, as with a fist hammering on our skull, then why do we read it? So that it shall make us happy? Good God, we should also be happy if we had no books..... A book must be an ice-axe to break the sea frozen within us.’ [Kafka, aged 20]

I identify with Kafka's passionate viewpoint, and, as a writer, it has set me an almost impossible task. My new novel is a dystopia - it flowed from my pen with refreshing cataracts of anger and bitter humour against the brutal, chaotic, society I created; dystopia is a perfect metaphor, and a safe one, behind whose barriers we can snipe at what we know and hate.

Dystopia is also a seductive literary form for writers and readers; one of my favourites is Yevgeny Zamyatin's tragic 1921 novel 'We' . Zamyatin, writing in a post-revolutionary Soviet state, began his work after the failed uprising of 1905, but even four years after the revolution, his political masters took an obsessive interest in novels dealing with dysfunctional fictional societies, and Zamyatin was forced to flee to exile in France, where he died in poverty.

'We' is an undeservedly neglected work these days - he was said to have influenced Orwell's '1984' and Ayn Rand's 'Anthem', amongst others - where individuals are 'numbers' and live in glass apartments where their every action can be observed, except for the allocated nights of sexual activity, when curtains may be drawn. The gradual evolution of the character D503, the narrator, a mathematician, begins with logical, conforming beliefs: 'One thing has always seemed to me most improbable: how could a government, even a primitive government, permit people to live without anything like our Tables—without compulsory walks, without precise regulation of the time to eat, for instance? They would get up and go to bed whenever they liked. ' and finally to a state of terrified rebellion, caused in part by political anger, but more by his frantic lust for the mysterious Number I-330: 'I am like a motor set in motion at a speed of too many revolutions per second; the bearings have become too hot, and in one more minute the molten metal will begin to drip and everything will go to the devil. Cold water! Quick! Some logic!.. L=f (D), love is the function of death. '

Utopian literature is a different species from dystopia; the plot plods along and the main characters are often ciphers with bland personalities, like the dinner guests in More's 'Utopia'. As H.G.Wells says, 'There must always be a certain effect of hardness and thinness about Utopian speculations ... That which is the blood and warmth and reality of life is largely absent; there are no individualities, but only generalised people. In almost every Utopia--except, perhaps , Morris's "News from Nowhere"--one sees handsome but characterless buildings, symmetrical and perfect cultivations, and a multitude of people, healthy, happy, beautifully dressed, but without any personal distinction whatever.'

The utopian writer's passion is generally not so much for story as for social or political theory; the structure of a utopian society must be laboriously exposited, and the most usual device to ensure the presence of a stranger who needs to be educated, is to have the protagonist accidentally fall into or stumble across Shangri La, or Erewhon --- thus the society described is not one we can live in - it is a tale told at a safe remove by returned visitors.

Referring to the study of literature, Kierkegaard wrote that ‘there are two ways. One is to suffer; the other is to become a professor of the fact that another suffers’. The same, I believe applies to writers. If we do not write our utopias and dystopias with passion (the Latin word whose very root means ‘suffering’ ) we set ourselves apart from, or even above, our fellow human beings who share the real dystopia in which we live.

And this is my dilemma as I begin the sequel to 'Dollywagglers'; to create a credible, unexpected, struggling society with some utopian elements, that is not devoid of emotion or predictably liberal, and in which minimal exposition takes third place, after story and character. I am reading books on energy and economics, and studying real utopian communities, none of which I had to do before I wrote 'Dollywagglers'.

We actually live in dystopias, we experience their inhuman regimes with their protagonists, we identify with Catniss or Winston as they take the first step away from safety towards risk, exposing themselves to the danger of being seen as individuals with subversive tendencies. Visitors, even if profoundly affected by their encounter with utopia, return to the security of their homeland, unless, like the brainless young Bertie Woosterish hero of 'A Crystal Age' he becomes so enamoured of that society he forgets his past as he attempts to dress like the citizens, to learn their culture, and to commit himself to a loving relationship with one of its mysterious residents. Of all the utopias I have read, 'A Crystal Age' by W.H. Hudson stands out as unique. . I wonder if J.G. Ballard was influenced by this book when he wrote 'The Crystal World', where a bizarre phenomenon occurs in the jungle of South America - plants, trees and animals are becoming crystallised. The metaphor is of slow and inexorable death, but purity and perfection are part of the equation too. A similar perfection is worshipped in Hudson's book, along with that figure of sacred reverence, The Mother.

Marx wrote ‘I believe there is no compulsion for the writer to put into the reader’s hands the future historical resolution of the social conflicts he is depicting.’; which I interpret as the freedom, when creating a society with utopian strands, not to cross every t or dot every i. And as to the social evolution of my flawed utopia, as long as the story is absorbing and the characters engaging, its future development can safely be left to the reader’s imagination.

Utopian stories give us emotionally cool theoretical or metaphorical frameworks; but to make them vivid, to breathe life into those long dead conceits, we must become the passionate bridge to link their ideas to our present situation; beyond the general or universal, we need to create immediate and specific connections with our lineage of utopian literature, while shocking the reader with insights into undercurrents and dissatisfactions of the' now' we live in. As Kierkegaard says, 'It is not worthwhile remembering that past which cannot become a present.’



'Dollywagglers' is published by Tenebris books on April 28th.
Photo credit: John Perivolaris

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